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6342 If you've seen reports today about resesarch suggesting that coffee can reduce the risk of recurrence in some people with breast cancer, you might be wondering whether making changes to your lifestyle can really help.

The answer is that making small changes, such as being a healthy weight and taking regular exercise, may help to reduce the risk of breast cancer returning. 

And while the coffee study is interesting, much more research is needed before we can fully understand the effects coffee and caffeine might have on the risk of recurrence.

We often get calls to our Helpline from people who want to know what they can do to reduce their risk of the cancer coming back, and we've written about this before on our blog and in Vita magazine.

Read more about lifestyle
changes and recurrence

We're here to help

If you have questions or concerns about this please call our free Helpline on 0808 800 6000. Your call will be answered by a breast care nurse or trained expert with personal or professional experience of breast cancer.

Read our statement to the press on the study.


 

 

Post date: 22 April 2015

Responding to a study by Lund University that shows coffee inhibits the growth of tumours and reduces the risk of recurrence in women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with the drug tamoxifen, Jackie Harris, Clinical Nurse Specialist at Breast Cancer Care, says:

 

“After finishing treatment for breast cancer, many women are terrified the cancer will come back or spread to other areas in the body. Understandably, they want to know what they can do to improve their chances of surviving.

 

“Though this is an interesting study much more research is needed before we can fully understand the effects coffee and caffeine can have on tumour growth or risk of recurrence.

 

“Making small changes, like maintaining a healthy weight and taking regular exercise, can help to reduce the risk of breast cancer returning. However, the type and stage of the breast cancer and the treatments given are the biggest factors influencing each person’s survival.”

 

For further information, please contact:

Sheryl Plant, Press Manager, Breast Cancer Care

020 7960 3532 (out of hours 07702 901 334)

Sheryl.plant@breastcancercare.org.uk

 

Notes to editors

About Breast Cancer Care

Breast Cancer Care is the only specialist breast cancer support charity working throughout the UK. We were founded in 1973 by Betty Westgate, who was herself diagnosed with breast cancer. In the ensuing forty years we have supported millions of women and their families through our face-to-face, phone and online services. We also provide training, support and networking opportunities to specialist breast cancer nurses, and Breast Cancer Care publications are used by the majority of breast cancer units throughout the UK. We campaign for better support and care and promote the importance of early detection, involving people with breast cancer in all that we do. Visit www.breastcancercare.org.uk or call our free helpline on 0808 800 6000.

Post date: 21 April 2015

6225

You may have seen reports today about a drug that one day could help overcome resistance to routinely used hormonal treatments for a common type of breast cancer.

For some this interesting research will be cheering.* For others it may reawaken fears that their cancer could come back or spread to other parts of the body.

We get many calls on our Helpline from women who have finished their breast cancer treatment - it’s a confusing time, isn’t it, when you're trying to readjust to going back to work and family responsibilities but still struggling with the side effects from treatments? The cancer diagnosis still feels raw and worries about the future may be overwhelming.

Leaving the safety net of regular hospital appointments, people can feel lonely and isolated. They often have worrying questions, such as: ‘How will I know if the cancer comes back?’ or ‘Who can I talk to now about my concerns?’.

Then there are the expectations of families and friends, or even of themselves, that life should return to ‘normal’ now that treatment is over.

You're not alone

When people call our free Helpline to talk about these concerns, they are often comforted to know that others find this time really difficult too.

And we're able to give people the time and space to express their concerns fully and explore their feelings about how life is for them now.

Free services

We can refer people to our free services such as Someone Like Me, which puts people in touch by phone or email with a trained volunteer who has had a similar experience. Some of our volunteers are partners of people who've had a breast cancer diagnosis so can offer support to other people in the same situation.

We can send out our free Moving Forward resource pack, which covers issues such as managing the effects of treatment, and body image and relationships.

It can also be reassuring to meet up with others face to face and share experiences. Our local Moving Forward courses cover a variety of topics from managing the side effects of treatment to improving wellbeing. These talks are given by expert speakers who are happy to answer questions.

Here to listen

You don’t have to have a question to call the free, confidential Helpline; we're here to listen when life after breast cancer feels an uphill struggle. Just call us on 0808 800 6000

*Read our full response to release of the research findings.

Post date: 21 April 2015

Responding to initial results from a study carried out in lab samples showing that a drug could help overcome resistance to routinely used hormonal treatments for a common type of breast cancer, Catherine Priestley, Clinical Nurse Specialist at Breast Cancer Care, says:

“After finishing treatment for breast cancer many women are terrified their cancer will come back or spread to other parts of the body. So we welcome any new treatment that may help reduce the risk of breast cancer recurring, particularly in cases where women have become resistant to other drugs, such as Tamoxifen.

“However, this interesting research is in its very early stages and requires further clinical trials to establish whether it may have any benefit for patients in the future.”

 -Ends-

 

For media enquiries please contact: Sophie Softley Pierce, Press Officer, Breast Cancer Care; 020 7960 3505 (out of hours 07702 901 334); sophie.pierce@breastcancercare.org.uk 

About Breast Cancer Care
Breast Cancer Care is the only specialist breast cancer support charity working throughout the UK. We were founded in 1973 by Betty Westgate, who was herself diagnosed with breast cancer. In the ensuing forty years we have supported millions of women and their families through our face-to-face, phone and online services. We also provide training, support and networking opportunities to specialist breast cancer nurses, and Breast Cancer Care publications are used by the majority of breast cancer units throughout the UK. We campaign for better support and care and promote the importance of early detection, involving people with breast cancer in all that we do. Visit www.breastcancercare.org.uk or call our free Helpline on 0808 800 6000.

Post date: 20 April 2015

You may have read or heard press reports recently about a blood test that in future might be able to predict how likely individual women are to develop breast cancer.

The reporting is based on exciting new research that points to an interesting area for development. But, as spelt out in this website post by Cancer Resarch UK, it's a lot too early to say that it will ever become part of women's healthcare.

Our chief executive Samia al Qadhi says:

'While this study offers the prospect of predicting who may develop breast cancer in the future, it is still a long way off clinical practice. We look forward to hearing how this research progresses.'

4730 Be breast aware

In the meantime, it's important for women to stay breast aware by following our breast awareness checklist.

  • Look at and feel your breasts so you know what's normal for you.
  • Do this regularly to check for changes.
  • Tell your doctor as soon as possible if you notice anything. 

For more detail, watch our newly updated breast awareness film. In it, women discuss what breast awareness means to them and our clinical nurse specialist Jackie Harris describes how to be breast aware.

Watch our breast awareness film

Or you can listen to Jackie discussing some of the questions we're often asked about signs and symptoms to look out for.

We're here to help

If you have any breast health questions or concerns, please ring our free Helpline on 0808 600 8000.

 

Post date: 20 April 2015